Summer Dangles

Earrings are fun to make on lazy summer days — you can make several pair and feel like you’ve managed to do some work, before you kick back under the AC or stop for a cool drink. 🙂

I enjoy working with salvaged jewelry — the cast-offs, the broken chain, the solitary earring, the old and unworn pieces that owners no longer want. Several of these earrings contain repurposed parts.

The small rose hearts came from an old anklet. I added Swarovski crystals for some bling. The “winged” rhinestone (again, with a Swarovski crystal) came from a friend’s broken necklace. The brown “cat’s eye” was part of a multi-piece earring. (Click any image for a larger view.)

I did these in between weeding, laundry and, oh yeah, pausing for something refreshing.

What things are you creating this summer?

 

 

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June Challenge — Earrings

Okay. I guess I’m first out of the gate. I didn’t intend to make “flowers” with these earrings but I think they fit the challenge. 😉

Silver Leaf

The beads are 6 mm Montana Blue Luster Twist wired onto metal leaves and hung on rhodium-plated posts.

I had so much fun with this pair that I made two more pair, with wooden beads and glass leaves.

So who’s up next? The challenge is open to anyone. Drop a note via the contact form and I’ll send the scoop on how to submit photos of your work.

Where’s the Inspiration?

If you create art you’ve probably been asked where you get your ideas. That’s a question with many answers.

This necklace, my latest piece of beadwork, was inspired by recent hikes on the desert — there’s an amazing array of colors and shapes to choose from and part of the fun is working them into the design.

What’s inspiring you these days?

Cafeteria Gallery Art Show

The next show at the Cafeteria Gallery will include work on the theme of intimacy. Morgana Wallace-Cooper is the featured artist. Her body of work titled The Intimacy Shift is a series of two- and three-dimensional work that addresses the role of sex in the institution of marriage.

This series was created as an outcome of her graduate school work and is comprised of ceramic tableaus, sculptures and mixed media drawings.

“The concept originated from ideas and theories explored with my practicum supervisor Suzie Klotz and grew out of personal experiences from my life in Arizona as an independent woman newly married. It was also inspired by my desire to return to the studio in order to be more informed in my work as a community-based artist,” says Wallace-Cooper.

In addition to Wallace-Cooper’s work, all gallery members are invited to exhibit and submit pieces on the theme of intimacy. Those who are not yet members of the gallery are encouraged to join for a $25 per year member fee. Up to three pieces will be accepted on Monday July 2nd.

The show will open on Friday July 6th with an opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30pm. The opening will include a fashion show hosted by Repeat Performance, a gently used clothing business by owner Jovita Wallace. Wallace will be showing intimate clothing and casual sleepwear on volunteer models from the community. Models will also be donning jewelry made by local artists. All modeled clothing and jewelry will be available for sale at extremely reasonable prices once they leave the runway.

Muffet Rowe will be the MC for the event and all are invited. “We want to keep the arts alive over the summer and get people interested in what is happening in the gallery. We hope people will come out to view the fashion show as well as the artwork of our talented local artists,” says Wallace-Cooper.

The Cafeteria Gallery is located at 401 W. Esperanza Ave, Ajo, AZ.  For more information contact the gallery at (520)387-6858 between 1pm and 5pm Monday through Friday or Morgana Wallace-Cooper at (520) 419-9183.

Ndebele Necklace

Women of Africa’s Ndebele tribe are known for their elaborate beaded necklaces. Across the pond in Europe and North America this pattern is called herringbone.

It’s an old design. Some say it goes back to ancient Egypt, where the stitch was used in gold chains. And it was used in embroidery and weaving long before beaders adopted it.

Whatever its name, the stitches are instantly recognizable — slanted rows of tilted stitches that form a zigzag pattern.

One of the things I enjoyed about doing this piece was the almost meditative mindset of repeating stitches.

I’d originally planned to include a large focal bead in the design but decided to stay with the basic stitch — the bright colors don’t seem to need any enhancement.

You can see more of my beadwork here.